Neuroscience • 27 March 2017
London • United Kingdom

Michael Hayden, MD, PhD

  • President of Global R&D, CSO, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries

Dr. Michael Hayden is the President of Global R&D and Chief Scientific Officer at Teva.

Dr. Hayden was recently named one of the 50 Canadians born in the 20th century who have changed the world. He also remains a Killam Professor of Medical Genetics at the University of British Columbia and Canada Research Chair in Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine. He is a Senior Scientist at the Center for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics (CMMT) in Vancouver, Canada; a genetic research center within UBC. He is also the Program Director of the Translational Laboratory in Genetic Medicine at the National university of Singapore and Astar. Dr. Hayden is the founder of three biotechnology companies: NeuroVir Therapeutics Inc., Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc., and Aspreva Pharmaceuticals Corp.

Author of over 700 peer-reviewed publications and invited submissions. Michael and his research group have identified 10 disease-causing genes which includes the identification of the major gene underlying high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in humans. Michael also identified the first mutations underlying Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) Deficiency and developed gene therapy approaches to treat this condition, the first approved gene therapy in the western world. Michael is the most cited author in the world for ABCA1 and Huntington Disease.

Michael is the recipient of numerous prestigious honours and awards, including one of PharmaVoice’s “100 of the Most Inspiring People in Pharma” (2015); an Honorary Doctor of Science by the University of Gottingen (2014); the Luminary award by the Personalized Medicine World Conference (2014); July 2012 Diamond Jubilee Medal, on behalf of HRH Queen Elisabeth II, in recognition of his significant contributions and achievements, the Margolese National Brain Disorder Prize (2011), awarded to Canadians who have made outstanding contributions to the treatment, amelioration, or cure of brain diseases; the Killam Prize by the Canada Council of the Arts (2011), in recognition of his outstanding career achievements; and the Canada Gairdner Wightman award (2011), recognizing him as a physician-scientist who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in medicine and medical science. Michael has also been awarded the Order of Canada (2011), and the Order of British Columbia (2010). He was named Canada’s Health Researcher of the Year by CIHR in 2008, and he received the Prix Galien in 2007, which recognizes the outstanding contribution of a researcher to Canadian pharmaceutical research.

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